Clinical trials

Clinical trials give the patient access to new drugs and treatments which they would otherwise be unable to obtain, always guaranteeing patient safety and very strict ethical control.

A clinical trial is the method used in medicine to see whether a new drug or method of diagnosis is really better than the standard treatment.

Clinical trials are of enormous help in enabling medical science to advance, given that they enable us to evaluate all interesting aspects of diseases in a regulated and controlled fashion.

Sometimes in cancer clinical trials we achieve only very small advances, but it is the overall sum of these advances that makes it possible for us to fight cancer. Thanks to research, today we have effective cancer drugs.

At Onkologikoa we firmly believe in clinical research as a guarantee of excellence in caring for our patients. That’s why we will offer them the opportunity to participate in a clinical trial whenever possible.

We help you to find clinical trials.

We will be delighted to meet you personally and inform you about the clinical trials currently underway.

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Active clinical trials

Below we give a short list of the trials running in different areas.

Legal reasons prevent us from providing extensive information on this website for each trial. However, we will be delighted to meet you and explain it to you personally.

Trial with a new chemotherapy agent in patients with breast cancer who are candidates for induction chemotherapy prior to surgery.

Breast cancer

Trial with a new antibody associated to chemotherapy in patients with HER2 positive tumours who are candidates for chemotherapy prior to surgery.

Breast cancer

Trial with a new diagnostic test enabling the identification of candidates for chemotherapy and those who would gain no benefit from it.

Breast cancer

Trial with a new subcutaneously administered drug in patients with HER2 positive tumours who are candidates for chemotherapy after surgery.

Breast cancer

Trial with a new antibody associated to their regular treatment in patients with HER2 positive tumours who are candidates for chemotherapy after surgery.

Breast cancer

Trial with a new drug in patients with metastatic breast cancer with hormone and HER2 negative receptors.

Breast cancer

Trial with a new antibody associated to their regular treatment in patients with metastatic HER2 positive breast cancer.

Breast cancer

Trials with new drugs in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

Cancer of the digestive system

Trial with personalised chemotherapy type assignation after non-small cell lung cancer surgery.

Lung cancer

Trial with a new alternative drug to chemotherapy in patients with metastatic or non-removable non-small cell lung cancer.

Lung cancer

Trial with new immunostimulant drugs to reduce the risk of relapse after surgery on high-risk melanoma.

Skin cancer

Trial with new drugs aimed at molecular targets in malignant melanoma with mutated BRAF and with non-mutated BRAF.

Skin cancer

Trials with new BRAF inhibitors and with new MEK inhibitors.

Skin cancer

FAQs

Discover the answers to all the questions you are asking.

Cancer treatment is successful in the majority of cases. However, there are still many questions to be answered and patients for whom the existing treatments are of very limited use. Everything that has been achieved in the fight against cancer and that will be achieved in the future is based on clinical trials.
Participating in a clinical trial has two main benefits: firstly, the direct benefit of having access to a treatment which could be better than the current one and which could not be administered outside the clinical trial, and secondly, the unquestionable benefit of helping to improve the treatment of future patients with the disease.

Before being offered to patients, clinical trials pass a series of strict controls and are always supervised by an ethics committee who keep a close watch to ensure that they are adequate.
In any case, before participating in a clinical trial, your medical team will provide you with extensive information about the trial and will guarantee, by obtaining your signature of an informed consent, that you have understood the nature and details of the trial.

No. Clinical trials are not only carried out on people in the most serious situations or advanced cases of the disease, they are carried out in all its areas. In absolutely no way does simply being a candidate for a clinical trial mean a poor prognosis.

Every trial has strict criteria of inclusion; this means that it can only be offered to patients with very specific characteristics. The medical team will inform you, at all times, whether or not you are a candidate for a clinical trial.

At Onkologikoa we firmly believe in clinical research as a guarantee of excellence in the care of our patients

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